Oil Museum will host book signing July 27 for award-winning Piney Woods chronicle
Jul 18, 2013 | 2485 views | 0 0 comments | 69 69 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Book signing is July 27 at East Texas Oil Museum

Event set for Noon to 3 p.m.


 


The East Texas Oil Museum at Kilgore College will host a book signing this month by Milton Jordan and Dan Utley, authors of the book, Just Between Us: Stories and Memories from the Texas Pines.

Jordan and Utley will be on hand for the signing, along with Lanella Spinks Gray, a Kilgore native who was a contributing author of the book.

The event is set for Noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 27.

According to the authors, the book is a compilation of brief memories told firsthand by East Texans that serve as glimpses into the life in the Pine Belt that have not been recorded or widely shared.

The book was recently awarded the Ottis Lock Award given by the East Texas Historical Association.

About the book:

East Texas is a distinct cultural and geographical region roughly the size of the state of Indiana. Those who have lived and worked in East Texas share a common sense of place that has provided some of the state's more colorful characters and most enduring landmarks, as well as a richly-layered cultural history. The region has also produced a large number of historians and storytellers who have successfully drawn upon their diverse and unique heritage to chronicle the past. Just Between Us will be at one level the inside story of a large community, where all residents comfortably share somewhat familiar stories about home. It is also, however, a regional record for others to enjoy, analyze, and celebrate. The stories are firsthand accounts by those who know the region best, and they serve as glimpses onto life in the Pine Belt that to this point have not been recorded or widely shared. They are, for the most part, small stories that might not be found in general histories but that nevertheless collectively make a profound statement about the unique character of an important region.

About the authors:

Dan K. Utley, a native of Lufkin who grew up in Woodville, is a graduate of the University of Texas and Sam Houston State University. He served for many years on the staff of the Texas Historical Commission and is now adjunct professor and chief historian of the Center for Texas Public History at Texas State University. He has co-authored several books on Texas topics, including History Ahead, History Along the Way, and Faded Glory: A Century of Forgotten Texas Military Sites. A fellow of the Texas State Historical Association, he is a past president of the East Texas Historical Association and Texas Oral History Association. He lives in the Austin area.

Milton S. Jordan is a native Texan, born in Waco and reared in East Texas. He graduated from Southwestern University with a BA in history and received a Master of Divinity degree from Southern Methodist University. Following many years in the ministry, he retired from Grace United Methodist Church, Houston Heights. A past president of the East Texas Historical Association, he now lives in Georgetown.

Lanella Spinks Gray is a native Kilgore, graduating from Kilgore High School in 1951.  She attended Kilgore College, graduated from Baylor University in 1954 and did graduate work in theater in 1955. She and husband, Tom, reared three boys in Houston. After Tom retired, they moved to Independence, a small village near Brenham, where Baylor University started in 1845. Gray is very involved with Baylor University in the Preservation of Independence and volunteers in Washington County as a court-appointed special advocate for children who have been removed from their homes by CPS for abuse or neglect.  She is also on the Board of the Scott and White Hospital Foundation in Brenham and active in her church, First United Methodist Church in Brenham. She was widowed in 1998 and has nine grandchildren.

 

 

 

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