TEXAS A&M FOREST SERVICE EMPLOYEES HONORED DURING ANNUAL AGRILIFE CONFERENCE
Jan 14, 2013 | 694 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print


Jan. 8, 2013 — COLLEGE STATION, Texas — A 20-year veteran forester with Texas A&M Forest Service was honored Tuesday with 2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award in Excellence for Public Service in Forestry.



 



Sustainable Forestry Department Head Burl Carraway III received the award during the annual Texas A&M AgriLife Conference held at Texas A&M University’s flagship campus in College Station.



 



The Award in Excellence for Public Service in Forestry is one of 17 awards presented each year by the Vice Chancellor for Agriculture and Life Sciences as a way to recognize and celebrate the commitment and contributions made by those working under the umbrella of Texas A&M AgriLife. 



 



The forestry award, in particular, is presented each year to someone who consistently goes above and beyond, making exceptional contributions and displaying exceptional commitment to the agency’s mission.



 



“Burl is innovative and willing to take on some of the toughest issues facing the agency and Texas.  His entire career can be characterized by someone willing to push the envelope and look for new ways to meet our natural resource challenges,” said Texas A&M Forest Service Director Tom Boggus. “He is a proven leader and has built a very strong team that is the envy of forest agencies across the nation.”



 



Throughout his career, Carraway consistently has taken the lead in coordinating various state projects and programs including environmental forestry, state stewardship and water quality. He also has led projects across the Southern United States as a member of professional organizations such as the Southern Group of State Foresters, the Texas Forestry Association and the Texas Society of American Foresters. 



 



Carraway earned a Bachelor of Science in biology from Furman University in 1991 and a Master of Forest Resources from Clemson University in 1993.



 



“Service is at the heart of our agency, and it’s an honor to receive an award that is reflective of that,” said Carraway, who is based in College Station. “Everyone who works here does so because they want to make a difference. I’m extremely fortunate to be surrounded by a really great group of folks.”



 



Five other Texas A&M Forest Service employees also were recognized at the conference.



 



State Wildland Urban Interface and Prevention Coordinator Justice Jones of Conroe and East Texas Operations Department Head Wes Moorehead of Lufkin were honored as graduates of the Texas A&M AgriLife Advanced Leadership Program - Cohort I, which ran from May 2010 to January 2012.



 



The 18-month program focuses on the development of leadership skills and a greater understanding of The Texas A&M University System and its land-grant mission. As part of the program, participants interact with administrators, leadership professionals and their peers, gaining experience and tools designed to enhance their effectiveness as leaders. 



 



“This was a great growth opportunity for me,” Moorehead said. “It not only offered outstanding leadership tools and training, but gave me a much better understanding of how TFS fits within Agrilife and the Texas A&M System.”



 



Jones echoed his sentiments, saying he felt privileged to have been selected to participate in the programs' first cohort.



 



“It provided me with a clear understanding of the important role that Texas A&M Forest Service plays in helping the Texas A&M University System achieve its land grant mission.”



 



Regional Forester Joel Hambright and Wildland Urban Interface Specialist Karen Stafford were recognized for joining Cohort II, which started last May and will conclude in January 2014.



 



Paul Hannemann, Incident Response department head and chief of fire operations, also was recognized during the conference as a recipient of the 2012 Regents Fellow Service Award, an honor bestowed upon him last fall.



 



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