Paranormal Truth
Jul 25, 2013 | 2261 views | 1 1 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print

4 Misconceptions People Have About the

Paranormal

Investigator Says TV Shows often Misrepresent the Process

In the spirit of the famous quote from J.B.S. Haldane, that the universe is not only stranger than we suppose “but queerer than we can suppose,” paranormal investigator Kaye Giuliani says boring experiences can often be intensely fascinating – after the fact.

“ ‘Reality TV’ has it all wrong,” says Giuliani, who travels the country with members of her company Proof Finders Paranormal Investigations to study reports of haunted activity. “Most investigations are deadly boring.  We don't run from room to room hissing ‘What was that?’ at each other. There are no shocked expletives or team members bolting down dark hallways.”

It’s after investigating haunting scenes that evidence is found, when plodding through hours of digital recordings and other data, she says.

Giuliani, the author of the “Charity Fish” trilogy, including her latest book, “Grains of Truth,” (http://tinyurl.com/pnre9ka), teamed up with her friend Dorothy Gibson to co-found the research firm after a bout with cancer left her with a lot of questions about what comes next. The friends had a transformative moment when staying the night in Gettysburg at an old inn.

“The place was completely empty except for Dorothy and me – no one in neighboring rooms or in the parking lot, and no electronics were on – when we caught a digital recording of a man's deep voice saying ‘hi,’ as if he had been standing right next to us,” she says. “The inn has a long history of paranormal activity. We were excited, but not scared. Dorothy has always had a gift of being connected to spirits, and our investigations have been able to put it to good use.” 

In addition to reality TV’s misrepresentations, Giuliani reviews four more ways in which many misunderstand the paranormal:

• Why are some spirits ‘left behind’? The question that has hounded us since recorded history, and probably will for as long as human beings exist, is: what happens to us when we die? Evidence collected and analyzed from investigations from firms like Giuliani’s suggest, for one, that there is an afterlife and, second, that you can go to the other side when you’re “good and ready,” she says. “They tell us that the light is there and that they can choose when to go.”

• Ghosts are not monsters: The spirits of the dead linger at a certain location due to trauma, confusion or an unwillingness to move on. “They all have their reasons for staying,” she says, “watching over their families, or waiting for a grandchild to be born.” Once, a couple communicated to Dorothy that they had remained in an old house because, while alive, they had been taught that no marriages exist in heaven. The couple had been happy together for many years while alive, and continue to enjoy the family home as man and wife to this day, she says.

• People respond to spirits with fear: While there are people who can grasp the idea that ghosts are not here to hurt them, many of the living still respond hysterically upon coming into contact with a spirit. “We all have the ability to connect with spirits, but some are especially sensitive to their presence,” she says. “Most of us simply are not used to communicating with a ghost, but if it does happen, don’t give yourself a heart attack.”

• Investigators are not Satanists: Unfortunately, there are many people who have a very limited view on the work Giuliani’s firm does. “There are still people who are very concerned that our work in contacting, researching and even helping spirits find peace is some kind of witchcraft or Satanism,” she says. “That is a fearful and Medieval view of spirituality. Though we are Christians, we have chosen to adopt a more enlightened point of view.”

About Kaye Giuliani

Kaye Giuliani is the founder of Proof Finders Paranormal Investigations, Inc. Based in Odenton, Md., the investigating group of nine has developed a fan base numbering in the thousands throughout the world. Kaye published dozens of short stories in her 20s, and has recently published three novels, with a fourth on the way.  As a cancer survivor, and the mother of three grown children, Kaye has a renewed appreciation and vigor for her life’s passions.

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Joe Burkhart
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July 28, 2013
http://beyond-dead.com