Iris Garden Club float makes history
by MAC OVERTON
Oct 27, 2013 | 1034 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mirror Photo / Mary Laschinger Kirby<br>
LADY IESHA TATYANA FLUELLEN and her escort MaLique Fluellen represent the Colonade Egg, with live doves in the egg-shaped cage above the columns surrounding Lady Iesha. The representation won first place among civic clubs for the Iris Garden Club, and created a challenge as the tallest float in decades wove its way under power lines during the Queen’s Parade Saturday.
Mirror Photo / Mary Laschinger Kirby
LADY IESHA TATYANA FLUELLEN and her escort MaLique Fluellen represent the Colonade Egg, with live doves in the egg-shaped cage above the columns surrounding Lady Iesha. The representation won first place among civic clubs for the Iris Garden Club, and created a challenge as the tallest float in decades wove its way under power lines during the Queen’s Parade Saturday.
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The Iris Garden Club made history Saturday, Oct. 19, when the float it sponsored won first in the Civic Club division of the Queen’s Parade.

It was the first time in 76 years that a float sponsored by a black organization won the prestigious competition.

In recognition of the event, the Gilmer law firm of Brent Goudarzi and Marty Young is presenting Iris Club members with commemmorative plaques today.

The plaques state “The East Texas Yamboree Association recognizes The Iris Garden Club for winning 1st place with their float in the Queen’s Parade on Oct. 19, 2013. ‘Congratulations! You made history.’”

The plaque credits Goudarzi and Young with the presentation, and carries the logo of the 76th East Texas Yamboree.

The float was ridden by Lady Iesha Tatyana Fluellen, accompanied by her escort, MaLique Fluellen.

It was built by Iesha’s father, Ike Fluellen. Following the “Fabregé Egg” theme of this year’s Coronation and Parade, it represented the Colonade Egg.

Nine white doves were sitting above a waterfall in the egg-shaped wire cage. Two other white doves, untethered, sat on branches in front of Lady Iesha, and never attempted to fly away.

“I raised all the doves myself,” Ike Fluellen said. “They were pets.”

He is noted for his waterfalls at his house on South Montgomery St. in Gilmer, and used his skills in making the float.

In front of Lady Iesha, there was a cascading 4-foot waterfall.

It also was the tallest float in the parade in decades, and had to weave its way under power lines along the route.
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