Pyro sculptures: No 'burnout'
Dec 26, 2013 | 1315 views | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Courtesy Photo<br>
STANDING IN FRONT of his 25 ft. x 35 ft. “pyro sculpture” creation is traveling artist Stan Crombie. It was designed in the form of a “Star Ship” — a 5-pointed star (if you were looking at it from space) or a ship (looking at it from the ground).
Courtesy Photo
STANDING IN FRONT of his 25 ft. x 35 ft. “pyro sculpture” creation is traveling artist Stan Crombie. It was designed in the form of a “Star Ship” — a 5-pointed star (if you were looking at it from space) or a ship (looking at it from the ground).
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Traveling artist Stan Crombie, son of Gilmer residents Babs and Beemer Crombie, is back in town, having returned from the Northwest Washington area and eight years in Alaska.

He was featured in past Gilmer Mirror articles showcasing his “pyro sculptures,” glorified bonfires with a twist, sometimes literally like the one made on his last visit, a double helix.

Pyro sculptures are large works of art, made of dead trees, limbs and brush, then set on fire.

Instead of doing just burn piles, he makes geometric shapes or objects such as a dragon or Pegasus horse and then invites family and friends to watch the burn. It has become quite a spectacle.

Stan’s latest pyro sculpture that was recently built and burnt was in the form of a “star ship.”—a five-pointed star if you were looking at it from space and more like a ship looking at it from the ground.

The sculpture was 25 feet tall and 35 feet wide in most directions.

The burn print is minimal due to most of the wood being off the ground.

His biggest burn so far was 35 feet high and 70 feet long in the shape of a dragon.

The smallest was shaped like an hourglass and was only 15 feet tall with a 10-foot circular base, but the lower fire heat super forced the upper fire into a 50-foot blow torch-like pinnacle. It was awesome.

Like all pyro sculptures, each burn is as unique as its shape. Each takes about 40 to 80 hours to make, including collecting all the wood and transporting it to the burn site.

All the wood is dead and mostly picked off the ground. By the time the sculpture is done, he has touched each piece of wood and stick five or more times.

He has built each one by himself with limited tools — chainsaw, truck, ladder, and shovel. No screws, nails, ropes or wires are used to hold the works of art together.

There’s nothing to clean up after the burn. All the wood is interwoven like a beaver dam with some structural support buried in the ground. Although well built and strong, the sculptures are burnt soon after being completed.

Stan’s 12th pyro sculpture is soon on the way to be built for his 38th birthday celebration next month.

Passerbys traveling on FM 49 can see it actually being built at the B & B Ranch in a couple of weeks.

There’s so much dead wood around right now, this should be the best one yet.

With the idea of so much available art medium dead wood, Stan is considering using baling wire to secure some sculptures for more permanent works.

If you would like more information, you may contact him at Burningstan@aol.com.

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