Cattleman Victor Hill voices concern about recent article on GilmerMirror.com
by VICTOR HILL
May 04, 2014 | 1339 views | 7 7 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
I was quite concerned when reading a recent article called “Big Beef Industry wants to Double Animal Sales Tax on Texas Cattle Owners.”

This article can’t be further from the truth. It’s filled with lies and misconceptions.

First and foremost, the Texas Beef Checkoff program will not be a government tax. Taxes are paid to our local, state and federal government bodies and they’re certainly not refundable.

Our checkoff is not paid for by taxpayer dollars and is not a government program. In fact, checkoff programs cannot influence legislative issues listed in the article. It is a marketing assessment on cattle to be used for promotion, marketing, research and education. It is funded by everyday “average” Texas cattle producers. I raise cattle, so building demand for beef improves demand for my cattle. I like that.

Programs funded by the beef checkoff also have nothing to do with imports. In fact, the United States, by law cannot import beef from countries that have active foot-and-mouth herds. To say that we are putting our herds at risk and increasing supply is far from the truth and shouldn’t be used as a scare tactic.

Currently, checkoff programs are governed by an 18 producer directors, nominated by nine Texas beef and cattle organizations with two at-large members elected by the board. Take a look at the Texas Beef Council's financial report and you will see 88% of the funds were used for promotion, marketing, research and education. Only 11% was used for program administration. Our Texas Beef Council today has a staff of 14. This has dramatically decreased through the years, because of declining checkoff revenues due to drought and decreased cattle herds.

I also take offense to the comments about large industry groups. I’m a member of Texas Farm Bureau and our organization operates through our policy book. This policy book is developed by so-called “average” farmers and ranchers just like me.

The organizations supporting this referendum and representing me as a member are made up of “average” producers across Texas. I don’t understand how someone could write an article claiming there is no effort to educate “average” producers. You can’t hand feed everyone across this state and the information about the referendum is widely available.

If the author truly understood how checkoff programs work they would know the Texas Beef Council can only fund things like promotion, education, marketing, and research for beef.

I am an “average” cattle owner and see the value of the checkoff programs. To call this a tax is false. A Texas Beef Checkoff is refundable. By law, this program has a refund policy. If you don’t believe in the program, you have 60 days to ask for a refund. Taxes are not refundable. I’d like to see you try and get your income taxes refunded from the IRS. Let me know how that goes for you.

Don’t dim a bright future for the Texas Beef industry, get the real facts about the beef checkoff at texasbeef.org, texasbeefcheckoff.com or to see consumer programs in action visit txbeef.org.

Sincerely,

Victor Hill

Upshur County - Cattleman and Farm Bureau Board Member
Comments
(7)
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anonymous
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May 04, 2014
As usual,, the fat cattle people stick together,,

Just like the nut job running the farm aide bill in dc,,,

He has his head so far up obama's ass,, the methane has gone to his head,,,

and I guess the rest of the sheeple's are following,,

Ron Burgundy
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May 06, 2014
"You stay classy Gilmer."
Greg Mabus
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May 03, 2014
Well said Victor. As beef producers we have to promote our product.
Gene Hall
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May 02, 2014
I trust the guys who post under their own name. Just sayin"

anonymous
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May 01, 2014
The only government involvement is the government allows producers to vote to assess themselves a fee for promotion, research, marketing and education.

Brain,

ANY TIME THERE IS GOVERNMENT INVOLVEMENT in to days times... You had better hold on to your wallet, your land, and you damn gun...

You can say all the bull shit you want. But I for one have not trusted the GOVERNMENT since nafta went into effect.

There reason why trucks are so high, is because people buy them.. If you stop feeding the GREEDY. Sooner or later.. They will get the message,,

As far a the price of beef goes.. The same will happen to the cattle man.. Just a matter of time.



anonymous
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May 01, 2014
In the END... Mr Hill... It is run by the government.. does not matter what level.. and In the END.. the cost is passed along to your end customer,,,

Tax or not, Just like obama care,,, It is a form of taxation,,,

With the price of beef.. you guys ought to be getting really FAT,,,,
Brian Cummins
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May 01, 2014
Anonymous, please do diligent research before you make statements that are NOT true. The only government involvement is the government allows producers to vote to assess themselves a fee for promotion, research, marketing and education. Since we have the right to vote and live in a country where a majority rules, we need to examine what that means. Majority rules is a political principle providing that a majority usually constituted by fifty percent plus one of an organized group will have the power to make decisions binding upon the whole.

The Beef Checkoff program is administered by the Texas Beef Council. The 18 members of the TBC board of directors come from nine Texas agricultural organizations that include: Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Independent Cattleman Association, Texas Farm Bureau, Livestock Marketing Association, Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Texas Cattlewomen’s Association, Texas Association of Dairyman, Texas Purebred Cattle Alliance and the Meat Packers/Exporters Association. All producer groups with a vested interest in beef promotion, research, marketing and education.

I will agree with you that beef costs more today than it did several years ago, everything costs more. When I graduated from high school in 1971, it took about 10 or 12 calves to buy a pickup. You now have to sell about 40 calves to buy a truck.

Brian Cummins

Canton, TX