Sideglances
by SARAH GREENE
Jun 05, 2014 | 781 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mirror Photo / Mac Overton<br>
DAISY POTTER’S GOOD FRIENDS, Brenda and J.W. Jeffrey, center, visit with Miss Daisy’s daughters, Laura Parsons-Sergent  and Laine Potter, prior to Mrs. Potter’s funeral here Monday. J.W.’s Model T truck was in the funeral procession. Mrs. Potter rode in it in the 2007 Yamboree Queen’s Parade.
Mirror Photo / Mac Overton
DAISY POTTER’S GOOD FRIENDS, Brenda and J.W. Jeffrey, center, visit with Miss Daisy’s daughters, Laura Parsons-Sergent and Laine Potter, prior to Mrs. Potter’s funeral here Monday. J.W.’s Model T truck was in the funeral procession. Mrs. Potter rode in it in the 2007 Yamboree Queen’s Parade.
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WHEN SOMEONE lives to the age of 93, the news of her passing may seem like an old story, interesting mainly to the cohort of people, still living, who have reached a great age.

This was not true of Daisy Potter, whose obituary appeared in the Saturday, May 31 issue of The Mirror.

Her life story described a person who was a citizen of the world at an early age. Besides living in the Houston area, she spent time overseas in what is now Israel, while her stepfather was working on the Arab-American pipeline.

Richard S. Potter was living in Houston when he and Daisy were married in late 1945. They lived in Austin while he completed his degree from the University of Texas. A series of moves between Houston and Gilmer was in the interest of starting a new industry in Gilmer.

Potter, Jake Rowe and Bruce Blount, all now deceased, envisioned the business that became Gilmer Potteries Inc.

DAISY HAD never lived in a small town before, but you wouldn’t have discerned that from the way she threw herself into everything that was happening here.

When the Texas Folklife Festival originated in San Antonio, Daisy, Potter and the late Jack “Spot” Baird were a team of “possumologists” who set the Gilmer booth apart from other small town entries.

Memorable they were, as the advancing years were to prove.

For someone who was not a native or even a childhood resident of Gilmer, Daisy was a unique ambassador. As her obituary described her relationship with the Historic Upshur Museum, it was her most cherished endeavor.

“She continued to work on docents, on the board as an officer and even mowing the museum’s lawn when necessary. Her daughters, Laine and Laura, are proud to place The Historic Upshur Museum solo as her chosen charity for any posthumous gifts of friends wishing to honor Miss Daisy.

“Mrs. Potter always felt that her involvement in this lasting project was a way to say thank you to Gilmer and Upshur County for welcoming and adopting her and Potter when they placed roots in Gilmer.”

It is surely safe to say that we will not see her like again.
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